Welcome to Our Website

Key generator split second patch 1.04 games

Macos - dyld: Library not loaded ... Reason: Image not

Check website for malicious pages and online threats. I split a 15GB logical partition out of C: with Acronis Disk Director Suite 10 I changed the drive letter of that partition to E: and the label to Vista. Other, shorter ideas, f, and p: echoes of theme 1 motive.

Serial code oPL3 Programmer's Guide

Many Windows users don't know that they can run multiple copies, or instances, of the same app on their PC without having to install the app twice. Both of the instruction cache and data cache are logically considered to be a single cache, described as a split cache. Comprised of six squadrons, the Scimitar assault wing.

Activity code cpu architecture - What does a 'Split' cache means. And

Razer Raiju Tournament Edition review: "Finely tuned https://tyronline71.ru/crack/?key=483. BLES00538 1 Update Available. Westwood's traditional three-way war, pioneered by the Dune games and picked up in the C&C games in RA2: Yuri's Revenge, is the central gameplay premise for Generals.

25 Best Online Games for PC You Can Play (2020)

California Seen 6 Hours Ago Posted 6 Days Ago 63 posts 3 Years 1. April 1st, 2020 at 2: 39 AM, since edited. Video: Ellie Soutter's mother: 'For a split second I https://tyronline71.ru/crack/?key=488. Hangar 13 and published by 2K Games.

Hack google Play Games - Apps on Google Play

Product code, um40d57bftcug107, serial no, 105571 03650. Burn Notice is an American television series that originally aired on the cable television channel USA Network from June 28, 2020 to September 12, 2020. If you wait a split second when it comes low and then throw the ball right at it, the ball will hit the space ship, bounce and hit it a second time.

GM / Master map hacker and general hacking and cheating thread

More unit display options (volume, consumption). Neopets Cheats, Codes, and Secrets for Online/Browser. You gotta be willing to put a lot of work into even a demo of a Mario Kart game, and I already have a feeling this game won't be worth the play.

Bedrock Edition 1.2.13 – Official Minecraft Wiki

And dual exhaust or not, that is the ugliest back end on a new car sold today. Find an arrow box and jump on it 200 - 299 times, and then jump on top of an enemy to get an extra crystals. SPLIT/SECOND v [ENGLISH] NO-DVD/FIXED EXE (MB) Search for related No-CD & No-DVD Patch.

Cracked the Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 Reviews

Even though the display is not able to show all 200 frames per second in its entirety, what the display does show every 1/60 th of a second is produced from an input much closer in time to that frame. The Gratuitous B-Movie Column: Nemesis and Split Second. Disney games are now on Steam.

Send multiple sensor values over serial - Arduino Stack

The sound and video stops and the fps drops (from 50 to 25 or 20) for a split second during those instances, then returns to normal, then does it again and again. The games still giving me trouble are Firestorm, Red Alert 2 and Yuri's Revenge. The games are also capable of local split-screen multiplayer with up to four players, rather than the two-player limit of the previous-generation versions; four-player mode will reduce the frame rate to 30 frames per second.

Split Second Velocity English Language Patch

The System Link/LAN Party server list now sorts the available games by Host name. Sorry, you must be logged in to post a comment. Mostar) was constructed and opened in 1979 to accommodate traffic for the 8th Mediterranean Games held in Split in September of that year.

100 Code on WGN America: Cancelled or Season 2? (Release

There is a software buffer used for serial. It is a class of model that captures a suite of different standard temporal structures in time series data. Rekordbox is complete DJ software, from cloud music management to creative performance capabilities.

Registration key how split-screen co-op works in Call of Duty: Black Ops

The player with the lowest score in the most recent round shall have the highest ranking when the positions are reset. Much prefer this to the style of RE7. Shell - How to split the terminal into more than one "view.

Cheating in World of Tanks

Split second patch 1.04 games. Def split_file(file, prefix, max_size, buffer=1024): """ file: the input file prefix: prefix of the output files that will be created max_size: maximum size of each created file in bytes buffer: buffer size in bytes Returns the number of parts created. The odds of getting a radar number are about ten thousand to one.

Match Analysis Thread: FC Barcelona vs SSC Napoli

WhoScored Average Positions
AS Stat Page Average Positions
SofaScore Average Positions (Barca)
SofaScore Average Positions (Napoli)
UEFA Presskits Average Positions
InfoGol xG Plot (FT) (1.06-2.34)
InfoGol xG Plot (HT) (1.04-1.12)

FIRST HALF:

Despite a nervy opening 10 minutes, Barca seemed to take control of the remainder of the first half.
I will now try and break the play down into 15 min intervals to see progression of play from Barca's side and Napoli's side too.
0-15:
Barca's Heat Map
Barca's Touch Map
Napoli's Heat Map
Napoli's Touch Map
Action Zones
Possession Centers
Napoli took 140 touches compared to our 103, and made 117 successful passes compared to our 89. They also made more passes in their defensive third (37-30), mid third (64-51) and the attacking third (18-12) than us.
For Napoli, Demme had 5 passes into the final 3rd, with Insigne and Rui having 3 each, and Mertens and Zielinski with 2 each, and Ruiz and Callejon with 1 each.
For Barca, Alba and Raki (2 corners) made 3 passes into the final 3rd each, with GOAT and Grizzy with 2 each and MAtS and Lenglet with 1 each.
Both teams took 3 shots each, with Barca having 1 on target i.e Lenglet's goal, and Mertens' shot which hit the woodwork wasn't deemed so.
Napoli lost possession 4 times (2x Callejon, Ruiz and Zielinksi 1x) and Barca lost it 3 times (2x Griezmann and 1x Suarez).
Possession: 43-56

15-30:
Barca's Heat Map
Barca's Touch Map
Napoli's Heat Map
Napoli's Touch Map
Action Zones
Possession Centers

Touches: 175-108
Shots: 3-1
Shots on Target: 2-0 (Messi and Suarez 1x)
Dribbles: 9-0 (8 successful)
Interceptions: 2-0 (Pique and Alba 1x)
Loss of Possession: 3-0 (2x Griezmann, 1x Messi)
Total Passes: 150-92
Key Passes: 2-0 (Frenkie and Alba 1x)
Final 3rd Passes: 21-28
Possession: 63-37

Visually and Statistically a better session than the first 15 mins. The team really got it's act together and blew Napoli out of the water. Action Zones and Heat Maps prove that our attack was more near the center and the right flank and we had a better presence all through the middle of the pitch extending to Napoli's box, and their action down the middle was accounted for only 12% of their team play.

30-HT:
Barca's Heat Map
Barca's Touch Map
Napoli's Heat Map
Napoli's Touch Map
Action Zones
Possession Centers

Touches: 95-102
Shots: 2-1
Shots on Target: 2-1 (Ospina save, Suarez and Insigne's Pen)
Dribbles: 1-0 (Frenkie)
Interceptions: 4-2 (Alba x2, Pique and Frenkie x1)
Loss of Possession: 2-3 (Sergi and Griez x1)
Total Passes: 71-84
Key Passes: 1-0 (Alba cutback)
Final 3rd Passes: 5-39!!!
Possession: 40-60

Felt like we let this session slip away again. Both teams scored via a penalty, but otherwise it was a pretty lacklustre 15 mins, and Napoli utilised the flanks more effectively in this session than any other. The Action Zones, Touch Maps and Heat Maps prove the same.

Overall First Half:
Possession was 47-53, and Barca recorded all their 7 shots with 4 on target, managing to convert 3 of those, with one penalty. Barca made 284 passes compared to Napoli's 274 with an accuracy of 94% compared to Napoli's 92%.
Barca also managed an insane 15 dribbles, of which 14 were successful compared to Napoli's 1. (Insigne's dribble near the box)
Total Passes were 291-286, Key passes 5-2, and Passes into Final Third 35-85.
Semedo completed 4 out of 4 dribbles successfully, and Griezmann was pretty impressive completing 3 out of 3 dribbles. Needless to say GOAT tops the list with 5 out of 6 successful dribbles, with 1 inside the box, and Suarez chipping in with 1 successful dribble in the box too.
Barca made 7 successful interceptions, with Alba making 3, of which 2 were in the box and Pique with 2 and Frenkie and Lenglet with 1 each. Napoli made 6 interceptions, 2 by Rui and Demme each and Manolas and DiLorenzo with 1 each.
Barca and Napoli both lost possession 8 times, with Griezmann losing 4 of Barca's 8, and Messi with 2 and a dangerous loss of possession by Sergi near the box, due to a poor touch. Fabian and Callejon both lost possession twice each and Koulibaly's tackle on Messi which led to penalty being the only one lost by Napoli in a dangerous position.
Barca's first half heat map, corroborated with action zones and the possession centers shows that Napoli resorted to using the flanks more and couldn't find a footing in the middle of the pitch. (Comparing the Napoli touch map with Barca's interceptions shows that most of our successful interceptions came near our box, and it's also precisely where Napoli struggled to keep a hold of the ball).
We had a total xG of 1.04 as compared to Napoli's 1.12
Total Distance Covered: 50,015 m / 51,964 m (UEFA PressKits)
Per UEFA's PressKits, we made 10 Passes into the Final Third, 8 Key Passes and 2 Passes into the Penalty Area. No idea why there is a huge gap between their metrics and WhoScored's.

SECOND HALF:

Probably the most frustrating performance I witnessed in the second half of a UCL game, this season. At certain points in the game, it just felt like we didn't give 2 shits, and just wanted to run down the clock. I understand that it's impossible to press and attack for entire 90 mins, but I've seen far superior performances from the same team against other sides, despite having a healthy lead. Not to take anything from Napoli, but it seemed like they were more interested in the tie than we were.
As done above, I'll again split this into 15 minute intervals to get a better view on the progression of play by the teams.

45-60:
Barca's Heat Map
Barca's Touch Map
Napoli's Heat Map
Napoli's Touch Map
Action Zones
Possession Centers

Touches: 104-140
Shots: 0-4
Shots on Target: 0-1 (Insigne header saved)
Dribbles: 4(2) - 4(0) (Messi and Semedo x1)
Interceptions: 1-4 (Frenkie x1)
Loss of Possession: 2-3 (Alba and Raki x1)
Blocks: 4-1 (Semedo, Pique, Alba and Raki x1)
Clearances: 5-0
Total Passes: 72 - 111
Key Passes: 0-3 (Lobotka, Rui and Callejon)
Final Third Passes: 4-47
Possession: 39-61

We were properly outdone in this session. Napoli were all over us, and we were lucky not to concede. We made 4 blocks and 5 clearances all in and around the box, the defense really saved the team's ass, by allowing only 1 Shot on Target. What really surprised me is the higher volume of passes into our final third despite not having a single successful dribble, guess Napoli's positioning must've been top notch to pass and progress the ball inside consistently.

60-75:
Barca's Heat Map
Barca's Touch Map
Napoli's Heat Map
Napoli's Touch Map
Action Zones
Possession Centers

Touches: 192-99
Shots: 0-1 (Lozano's miss)
Shots on Target: 0-0
Dribbles: 6(6) - 4(4) (Insigne x3)
Loss of Possession: 6-5 (Griez x3, Messi Frenkie and Raki x1)
Interceptions: 2-5 (Koulibaly x2)
Clearances: 2-2
Blocks: 1-1
Total Passes: 148-72
Key Passes: 0-1 (Insigne x1)
Final Third: 57-19 (Every single Barca players had atleast 1 pass into the Final 3rd)
Possession: 67-33

Much better session from Barca, our incisive passing and dribbling really broke Napoli's shape, but we failed to register a single shot, and 4 of our 6 losses of possessions all happened around Napoli's box which led to turnovers. Pretty uneventful otherwise.

75-FT:
Barca's Heat Map
Barca's Touch Map
Napoli's Heat Map
Napoli's Touch Map
Action Zones
Possession Centers

Touches: 153-152
Shots: 0-8
Shots on Target: 0-1 (Lozano)
Dribbles: 8(5) - 4(4)
Loss of Possession: 9-6 (Messi x3, Suarez Monchu x2, Raki Frenkie x1)
Interceptions: 4-1
Clearances: 6-1 (Pique x3, Monchu x2)
Blocks: 7-1 (Lenglet x4)!!!
Total Passes: 103-105
Key Passes: 0-6 (Mertens x2, Insigne Rui Lobotka Milik x1)
Final Third: 14-64
Possession: 45-55

Another overwhelming performance by Napoli. Barca were pinned back into their half and couldn't get the ball out. Of Barca's successful dribbles only 2 of them were done in Napoli's half, while all of Napoli's dribbles were completed in our half. I'm pretty sure if Milik's goal wasn't offside we would've unravelled further, and could've conceded more.

Overall Second Half:
Possession stats were pretty balanced again 51-49, Barca didn't record a single shot let alone a shot on target in the second half. Napoli on the other hand recorded a total of 13 shots with 2 shots on target.
Barca made 11 successful dribbles of 16 in total, Semedo (3/4), Messi (2/3) and Frenkie (2/2) again lead the way in successful dribbles. Napoli made 8 successful dribbles out of 12.
We lost possession quite a bit at 16 (Messi x4, Griez Raki 3x, Suarez Monchu x2) all over the pitch. Napoli came close in 13 with Insigne x3, Manolas Koulibaly and Zielinski x2 leading the way.
Per UEFA's PressKits we only had 13 passes as compared to Napoli's 26 passes into the Final Third, 11 vs 16 Key Passes and 3 vs 8 passes into the Penalty Box in the second half.
Second half xG of Barca at 0.02, and Napoli's at 1.22! (LET THAT SINK IN)
2nd Half Barca Heat Map
2nd Half Napoli Heat Map
2nd Half Barca Touches
2nd Half Napoli Touches
Action Zones
Possession Centers.
Distance Covered: 54,948 m / 58,649 m

CONCLUSION:

I apologise if the post is more driven towards stats than actual analysis, so I'll mention them here. These are my takes:
  1. Busquets' role in this team is extremely vital. Rakitic didn't lose too many balls but is pretty poor in terms of absorbing the pressure and passing the ball out of it.
  2. Until we find an adequate replacement Vidal should be kept in the team. His pace, pressing and physicality were sorely missed yesterday and is probably the most reliable attacking outlet for the team apart from Messi and Alba.
  3. While people were demanding Puig's inclusion, I feel Setien did the right thing by subbing in Monchu. Monchu for Griezmann was the right sub to make, as Griez was pretty good but still lost too many balls esp in our half and didn't have too many successful dribbles, so Setien's decision to include Monchu was right, imo as it consolidated the midfield by making him play as a double pivot and helping release Sergi and Frenkie to the right and left half spaces respectively.
  4. Playing Sergi and Semedo together is a big mistake, imo. They occupy the same zones and don't push forward too much when playing together. Messi was the only outlet in the right flank and with him drifting inward, the same issues continue to persist.
  5. Frenkie needs to play in the left half space as he compliments Alba very well, and the two together have taken full charge on the left wing. They've been the most productive attacking zone for the team, despite no natural wingers present and without needing Messi Magic. I'm not sure if Fati could've added something to that, but I think that flank will work out much better than the right.
  6. Lenglet was absolutely immense yesterday with 6 blocks of the team's 19, and making 7 Passes into the Final 3rd. MOTMOTM for me.
  7. The team needs to take more risks and try beating players 1v1. It's no surprise that after one look at our stats and comparing them to the Top 5 Leagues', only Messi makes the cut, in terms of dribbling, passing and progression. Semedo was immense with 8 dribbles yesterday, but only 4 of them came in Napoli's half and were very much near the half way line.
  8. Total Successful dribbles by the team were 25 out of 31, and Messi accounts for 9 of them,if you remove him the dribbling stat doesn't look too bad but is limited to the central areas of the pitch and not too many in the final 3rd or even near the box.
  9. No flank play again without the Fullbacks. The overall heatmap of the team looks like this, this is the heatmap after removing Alba, Semedo and Sergi. This a clipping of Cruyff explaining the dangers of using fullbacks for building up play, something we're guilty of.
  10. While distance covered by itself, isn't too informative, Total Distance Covered yesterday was 104.963 km for Barca vs. Napoli's 110.613 km. That is a whopping 5.65 km difference. City despite dominating possession and every other stat, still covered 112 km compared to Madrid's 108 kms. Bayern did 108 km compared to Chelsea's 103 km despite dominating every stat, so I'd like to believe that if we want to create chances and press them effectively, we have to fucking work for it.
  11. Barca's First Half xG: 1.04 and Second Half xG at 0.02, as compared to Napoli's First Half xG of 1.12 and Second Half xG of 1.22. (Check InfoGol xG link at the start) ABSOLUTELY FUCKING INEXCUSABLE!!

I truly believe that this squad can do much much better than the standard of football witnessed yesterday, and what infuriated most of the fans was the fact that at times in the game, we just didn't care. We weren't outclassed tactically like Madrid were against City or out-muscled/ out-paced like we were against Liverpool last season, we just didn't fucking care. I hope the team turns it around and fights for this title, because this is the only trophy left to play for, and we potentially have only 3 games left.

Sources:

  1. UEFA PressKits:
https://www.uefa.com/newsfiles/ucl/2020/2027129_tl.pdf
https://www.uefa.com/newsfiles/ucl/2020/2027129_tpd.pdf (Passing Data)
https://www.uefa.com/newsfiles/ucl/2020/2027129_ts.pdf (Overall Stats)
https://www.uefa.com/newsfiles/ucl/2020/2027129_sps.pdf (Individual Stats)
  1. WhoScored
  2. AS Stat Pages (thanks to u/iVarun)
  3. SofaScore


Match Highlights:

https://www.yoursoccerdose.com/11989268-barcelona-vs-napoli-champions-league/

Full Game:

https://www.reddit.com/footballhighlights/comments/i64jqy/barcelona_vs_napoli_uefa_champions_league/

TalkFCB Analysis:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8--nK2iY4U

Please hit me up with any corrections or inconsistencies in the post, I'd appreciate it. (and y'all mf'ers better give me some awards for this shit)

Edit: I didn't do individual player analyses as making this was too time consuming in itself, so apologies for that.
submitted by thehariharan to Barca

Tom Brady vs Joe Montana: An In-Depth Historically Adjusted Comparison Of Two Of The GOAT QBs

When the GOAT QB discussion gets brought up, there are 3 main names that are stated: Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, and Joe Montana. Now Peyton Manning and Tom Brady have been compared for their entire careers, but when you compare to someone like Joe Montana, usually the extent of comparisons goes to how many SBs they won, went to, and some randomly selected stats that sound impressive (Montana never threw a pick in 4 Superbowls, Brady passed Montana for the most touchdowns thrown in a Superbowl, etc.) that usually get quoted from the Superbowls or postseasons they played in. When stats get brought up, understandably, the era argument is also brought up and a true statistical comparison is dismissed. The context about the environments they played in is usually dismissed or discussed at an extremely shallow level, compared to the comparison between Manning and Brady for example. So instead of leaving that comparison at a shallow level, let's do a deep dive into how Montana and Brady match up against one another.
Fyi, I am a 49ers fan, but I'll do my best to remain completely objective here, and feel free to call me out if you think that I became too homer during a portion of this write up.

The Statistics

So before we go ahead and do some comparisons, let's put their raw career stats out so its easy to see. For reference, I'm going to be taking out Montana's first two years, and Brady's first year before either of them were really starters. I will be including Montana's years as a Chief, but if I have time, or if there's a request to do so, I can also compare just Montana's year as a Niner, which is what he's truly known for. These stats are also their stats prorated for a 16 game season to allow easier consumption of the raw numbers. This also means that longevity won't be included here, but I think its important to say that Tom Brady has already had 2 more years as a starter than Montana did. Normally this would be a solid boost, but it is important to remember that player careers were shorter in earlier eras as the sport was more violent, especially for QBs who are now significantly more protected than they were before. Now going straight into the numbers.
Quarterback Cmp Att Cmp% Yds TD TD% INT INT% Y/A Y/C Rate Sk ANY/A Sk%
Joe Montana 330 522 63.2 3965 27 5.0 13 2.6 7.6 12.0 92.5 31 6.67 5.5
Tom Brady 355 557 63.8 4175 31 5.5 10 1.8 7.5 11.7 97.2 28 7.09 4.8
Now here, it seems that in almost every stat, Tom Brady manages to outperform Joe Montana, announcing a clear winner. However, this points to the differences between two eras. Now, let's take a look at the average passing stats in the eras that I'm measuring for them, also extrapolated to a 16 season game.
Quarterback Range Cmp Att Cmp% Yds TD TD% INT INT% Y/A Y/C Rate Sk ANY/A Sk%
Joe Montana 1981-1994 284.7 507.0 56.2 3240.6 20.6 4.1 19.7 3.9 6.4 11.4 72.8 40.2 4.5 7.3
Tom Brady 2001-2016 326.6 537.9 60.7 3521.6 22.7 4.2 15.6 2.9 6.5 10.8 81.9 36.3 5.3 6.3
Once again, here we can see that the differences in era are obvious, and just like the Montana/Brady comparison above, the modern QB is better in every area except for Y/A and Y/C. However, what happens when we adjust Montana and Brady's stats for the era they played in. Let's examine the ratio of their personal stats over this time range to the league average (so 1 means they were at league average, 1.5 means they were 50% higher, and .5 means they were 50% lower.
Quarterback Cmp Att Cmp% Yds TD TD% Int Int% Y/A Y/C Rate Sk ANY/A Sk%
Joe Montana 1.16 1.03 1.13 1.22 1.31 1.23 0.66 0.67 1.19 1.05 1.27 0.77 1.48 0.75
Tom Brady 1.09 1.04 1.05 1.19 1.37 1.31 0.64 0.62 1.15 1.09 1.19 0.77 1.34 0.76
Here we can see a better example of how Montana and Brady performed relative to their peers. Funnily enough, both of them didn't really attempt too many more passes than their peers, with Brady edging Montana in this category, however, this can be evaluated not as their team not giving them enough responsibility, but both of their teams being highly successful, which discouraged excess passes. However, with those attempts, Montana was able to complete a higher portion of his passes, resulting in higher era-adjusted completions and completion percentage. Now the general explanation for this is that a QB who attempts shorter passes can achieve a higher completion percentage (which is one of the reasons people give for why Sam Bradford just had the greatest completion percentage in NFL history among QBs who started at least 2 games and had 10+ completions), however, we can see here that Montana actually has a higher adjusted yards per attempt. This shows that Montana probably was a bit more accurate than Brady, as he attempted deeper throws and was still able to complete a larger percentage of his passes. The Y/C stat which Brady has a lead in though suggests that Brady is able to complete more of those deep passes, or get more YAC from his receivers, which could imply that Brady was more able to complete the passes that gave more yardage, either through the air or on the ground.
When you look at a pure yardage comparison, Montana comes out a little bit ahead of Brady. Probably a result of his higher overall accuracy and completion percentage, Montana seems to be coming out as the better volume passer, for his era. However, that picture changes when we start taking a look at the TDs and INTs. This is where Brady starts to get his advantage, as he threw more TDs, had a higher TD%, threw slightly less picks, but had a decently lower int% as well. What this shows is that while Montana was better at advancing up and down the field, racking up yardage and completions, when it came down to throwing TDs, or not giving up the ball, Brady had the advantage. It is interesting to note that their sacks and sack % though were nearly identical.
However, when we take into account the major statistics that take into account both yards, completions, and y/a, as well as TDs and INTs, Montana takes the final edge. He holds a considerable edge to Brady in both passer rating, and especially ANY/A, where both of them significantly outperformed their era, but Montana to an absolutely ridiculous extent.
So as a summary, Montana bests Brady in completions, completion %, yards, Y/A, passer rating, and ANY/A whereas Brady holds the edge against Montana in TD, TD%, INT, INT%, and Y/C. If we were just looking at this simple statistical comparison, I'd say Montana gets the edge so far overall, as he leads in the two comprehensive stats in passer rating and ANY/A, but there's a lot more analysis left to go.

Postseason and Clutchness

For both of these QBs, a lot of their legacy lives off of the fact that when their team needed it and depended on them, they performed a lot better. Tom Brady led his team to 5 Superbowl rings, where Montana led his team to a 4-0 record in Superbowls and never threw a single pick. So let's go back and see how these players did during their various postseason runs, and how they performed as the stage got larger and larger.
Firstly, lets take a look at their overall postseason stats. For ease of consumption and to correct for games played, these stats are per game.
Quarterback Cmp Att Cmp% Yds TD INT Y/A Sk Rate ANY/A TD% INT% Y/C Sk%
Joe Montana 20.0 31.9 62.7 251.0 2.0 0.9 7.9 2.0 95.6 6.99 6.1 2.9 12.5 6.3
Tom Brady 24.4 39.0 62.7 267.5 1.9 0.9 6.9 2.0 89.0 6.19 4.8 2.3 10.9 4.6
Now let's do the same thing as before and adjust this for era.
Quarterback Cmp Att Cmp% Yds TD INT Y/A Sk Rate ANY/A TD% INT% Y/C Sk%
Joe Montana 1.12 1.01 1.12 1.24 1.52 0.74 1.23 0.80 1.31 1.55 1.49 0.74 1.10 0.86
Tom Brady 1.20 1.16 1.03 1.22 1.31 0.94 1.06 0.79 1.09 1.17 1.14 0.79 1.01 0.73
So right away, we can see that Brady was asked to throw the ball a lot more in the postseason. Whether this was because his defense or he and his offense didn't perform as well in the postseason is up for debate, or perhaps its both, but he did match it up with a lot more completions. However, when looking at completion percentage, Montana still holds the advantage, though its about similar to the advantage he held in the regular season.
The real change starts occurring when you start looking at their TD and INT numbers, as well as percentages. Whereas Brady got worse in the postseason in these areas, which is to be expected when facing playoff caliber teams, Montana's TD and TD% actually shoot up enough that he actually starts beating Brady in that area and pretty handily as well. His int numbers sink as well, yet not as bad as Brady's, and he takes the lead in that area as well. The most amazing part of this is that Montana's yards per attempt actually increased, as did his yards per catch, which meant that he got this increased success while throwing the ball even deeper and taking more risks. Brady's stats follow a more logical trendline, as his Y/A and Y/C declines during the postseason, the Y/C enough so that it's almost inseparable from the league average. All of this influences the fact that Montana's passer rating and ANY/A is astronomically better than Brady's in the postseason, so much so that even before the adjustment for era, Montana's passer rating and ANY/A is already significantly ahead of Brady's. In fact, as a whole, the only areas where Brady possesses an advantage are completions, attempts, and sack %, whereas Montana takes the advantage in completion %, TDs, TD%, INTs, INT%, Y/A, passer rating, and ANY/A. It seems pretty obvious that, statistically at least, Montana is definitely the better postseason QB.
Also, although I don't want to clutter up the already messy space with a comparison during Superbowls, its interesting to see their raw statline during their Superbowls. Montana averaged around 21 completions, 68% completion percentage, 285 passing yards, 3 TDs, and 0 picks for a passer rating of 127.8. Brady averaged around 30 completions, 67% completion percentage, 295 passing yards, 2 TDs, and 1 pick for a passer rating of 95.3. The fact that before adjustment, Montana had a near inarguable better statline is extremely impressive.

Awards And Accomplishments

Section in comments

Supporting Casts and Environment

This is always the big qualifier for comparing QBs, and we've seen the peak of this with Manning/Brady debates. Manning had the better wide receivers, but Brady had a better rushing attack, but Manning had the better running backs, but Brady had the better coaching staff, but Manning had the dome to play in, but Brady had the better defense, etc. So to attempt to at least compare their supporting casts, let's see where each QB got a little more help than the other.
Head Coaches - Montana had one of the greatest coaches of all time and offensive minds in Bill Walsh for 8 years in the span we're measuring (81-88). The inventor of the West Coast offense, he allowed Montana to utilize his talents effectively to take the league by storm. After Walsh stopped, George Seifert took over, a defensive mind, but at this time, Montana was already an experienced enough vet to take care of the offense. Montana had Seifert for 4 years, and then when he went to KC he had Marty Schottenheimer for 2 years. Never really suffered through bad coaches, but he only really had Walsh for the first half of his career.
On the other hand, Brady has obviously had Belichick for his entire career. Largely considered the GOAT coach, he wasn't quite the offensive mind that Walsh was (not saying he wasn't a great offensive mind, just that he was known more for defense/special teams) and has shown that by consistently building good defenses around Brady. Additionally, as a GM, he's provided great pieces for Brady to work with, and always remained one step ahead of the rest of the league.
Choosing coaching situations between the two is honestly splitting hairs. Walsh probably did more for Montana's development as an offensive mind, however, was there to help Montana significantly less than Belichick has helped Brady. Honestly, this is pretty much of a wash.
Receivers - Usually the most discussed help when talking about supporting cast, here are the following WR1s and WR2s that Montana had (since Montana never had a TE in his top two in receiving yards, and RB analysis is going to come later), and how long he had them for.
1981-1984: Dwight Clark, Freddie Solomon
1985-1986: Jerry Rice, Dwight Clark
1987-1988: Jerry Rice, Mike Wilson
1989-1990: Jerry Rice, John Taylor
1993-1994: Willie Davis, JJ Birden
So 6 years of Dwight Clark and Jerry Rice, 4 years of Freddie Solomon, 2 years of Mike Wilson, John Taylor, Willie Davis, and JJ Birden.
Dwight Clark was a 2-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 1st team All-Pro receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 57.
Jerry Rice was a 13-time Pro Bowl, 10-time 1st team All-Pro, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro, Hall of Fame receiver, also more commonly known as a goat. During that stretch, he had an AV of 82.
Freddie Solomon was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 30.
Mike Wilson was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 10.
John Taylor was a 2-time Pro Bowl receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 20.
Willie Davis was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 17.
JJ Birden was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 13.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his #1 and #2 receiving options over his career was 229, at an average of 19.1 total AV per year.
Now let's look at Brady.
2001-2002: Troy Brown, David Patten
2003: Deion Branch, David Givens
2004: David Givens, David Patten
2005: Deion Branch, David Givens
2006: Reche Caldwell, Ben Watson
2007: Randy Moss, Wes Welker
2009: Wes Welker, Randy Moss
2010: Wes Welker, Deion Branch
2011: Wes Welker, Rob Gronkowski
2012: Wes Welker, Brandon Lloyd
2013: Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola
2014-2015: Rob Gronkowski, Julian Edelman
2016: Julian Edelman, Martellus Bennett
Interesting side note for Brady, there were several years around the 2010 years where Brady had a really deep WTE corps. Hence you never see Aaron Hernandez on here, or some Gronk years on here, even though they were near a 1000 yards at some points. Regardless, let's keep the same process of #1 and #2 target evaluation for consistency.
So 5 years of Wes Welker, 4 years of Julian Edelman, 3 years of David Patten, David Givens, Deion Branch, and Rob Gronkowski, 2 years of Troy Brown and Randy Moss, 1 year of Reche Caldwell, Ben Watson, Brandon Lloyd, Danny Amendola, and Martellus Bennett.
Wes Welker is a 5-time Pro Bowl, 2-time 1st team All-Pro, 2-time 2nd team All-Pro receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 73.
Julian Edelman is a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 39.
David Patten was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 26.
David Givens was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 21.
Deion Branch was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 26.
Rob Gronkowski is a 4-time Pro Bowl, 3-time 1st team All-Pro tight end, also more commonly known as a prime-only goat. During that stretch, he had an AV of 38.
Troy Brown was a 1-time Pro Bowl receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 25.
Randy Moss was a 6-time Pro Bowl, 4-time 1st team All-pro receiver, also more commonly known as almost a goat. During that stretch, he had an AV of 33.
Reche Caldwell was a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
Ben Watson is a tight end. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Brandon Lloyd was a 1-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 10.
Danny Amendola is a receiver. During that stretch, he had an AV of 6.
Martellus Bennett is a 1-time Pro Bowl tight end. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his #1 and #2 receiving options over his career was 319, at an average of 21.3 total AV per year.
After going through this, Brady had better receivers throughout the entirety of his career. Although he had more variability in his #2 receivers than Montana did, he had the ability to work with a few all-time talents in Gronkowski, Moss, and Welker (and in 3 years had 2 of these targets at the same time), while Montana only really had Rice in term of all-time talents. Additionally, Brady, at some points, had enough depth in his receiving corps to completely cover the fact that he had a talent like Aaron Hernandez for 3 years.
To give a modern example of what these receivers might be like, Montana’s receivers would be similar to having Jordy Nelson and Terrelle Pryor last year. Brady’s receivers would be similar to having Mike Evans and Larry Fitzgerald last year. So basically, the WR1s are similar, but Brady has had more depth and help at his second receiver position.
Running Backs - Now there are two aspects to the running backs that a QB has. First is there top RBs value as a player, as a rusher, receiver, overall player. This I'll estimate similarly to the wide receivers above using AV. The second aspect is the rushing production that they play with. This gives an approximation of how much the run game was used, and how well it was, to give an idea of how much opposing teams have to respect the run, and open up the pass. I'll analyze both of these contributors separately and see where they end up.
Starting out with the lead running backs, let's do a similar analysis as above to show which leading rushers Montana and Brady worked with. Let's start out with Montana.
1981: Ricky Patton
1982: Jeff Moore
1983-1984: Wendell Tyler
1985-1989: Roger Craig
1990: Dexter Carter
1993-1994: Marcus Allen
So 5 years of Roger Craig, 2 years of Wendell Tyler and Marcus Allen, 1 year of Ricky Patton, Jeff Moore, and Dexter Carter.
Roger Craig was a 4-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 1st team All-Pro, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 74.
Wendell Tyler was a 1-time Pro Bowl running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 22.
Marcus Allen was a 6-time Pro Bowl, 2-time 1st team All-Pro, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro, Hall of Fame running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 15.
Ricky Patton was a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 5.
Jeff Moore was a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 10.
Dexter Carter was a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 5.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his #1 running backs over his career was 131, at an average of 10.9 total AV per year.
Now let's look at Brady.
2001-2003: Antowain Smith
2004-2006: Corey Dillon
2007: Laurence Maroney
2009: Laurence Maroney
2010-2011: BenJarvus Green-Ellis
2012-2013: Stevan Ridley
2014: Jonas Gray
2015-2016: LeGarrette Blount
(Small fun fact, in 2013 Ridley edged out Blount by literally 1 yard, 773 vs 772)
So 3 years of Antowain Smith and Corey Dillon, 2 years of Laurence Maroney, BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Stevan Ridley, and LeGarrette Blount, 1 year of Jonas Gray.
Antowain Smith was a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 26.
Corey Dillon was a 4-time Pro Bowl running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 29.
Laurence Maroney was a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 17.
BenJarvus Green-Ellis was a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 18.
Stevan Ridley is a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 17.
LeGarrette Blount is a running back. During that stretch, he had an AV of 14.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his #1 running backs over his career was 121, at an average of 8.1 total AV per year.
While it is important to point out that Brady generally had more depth, with Blount or Woodhead who was never shown, Montana has without a doubt had the benefit of working with better running backs throughout his career. Plus any benefits of depth will show when analyzing total rushing production, so Brady gets a clear advantage here in performing to his level with less help from his #1 RB.
To give a modern example of what their RBs were like, Montana’s average RB was similar to Jay Ajayi, whereas Brady’s was similar to, funnily enough, LeGarrette Blount. So while Brady had a dependable RB with some very strong positive attributes that could be used well, Montana tended to have more of a great running back that helped him out
Now let's take a look at their rushing yardage and how it ranked to the average rushing yardage of that year
Here's Montana's numbers.
Year Team Rushing Yards Ratio To League Average
1981 1941 0.93
1982 740 0.70
1983 2257 1.09
1984 2465 1.24
1985 2232 1.12
1986 1986 1.05
1987 2237 1.20
1988 2523 1.30
1989 1966 1.07
1990 1718 0.94
1993 1655 0.94
1994 1732 1.04
To give a rough estimate of the era-adjusted rushing help he had, the average ratio between those years was 1.05, which means that throughout his career, Montana's rushing attack was generally around 5% better than the league average. That is akin to being the 10th best rushing attack, where the average would be the 16th best rushing attack.
Here's Brady's numbers.
Year Team Rushing Yards Ratio To League Average
2001 1793 1.00
2002 1508 0.81
2003 1607 0.85
2004 2134 1.14
2005 1512 0.84
2006 1969 1.05
2007 1849 1.04
2009 1921 1.03
2010 1973 1.08
2011 1764 0.94
2012 2184 1.18
2013 2065 1.14
2014 1727 0.97
2015 1404 0.81
2016 1872 1.07
To give a rough estimate of the era-adjusted rushing help he had, the average ratio between those years was 1.00, which means that throughout his career, Brady's rushing attack was pretty much the league average.
So after both sides of this analysis, it is beyond clear that Montana was able to rely more on a stronger run game and running backs throughout his career.
Offensive Lines
Once again, I'm going to be using a similar method of AV comparison to judge the difference between these two player's O-lines. For the purposes of this exercise and to make it cleaner, I will be taken the 5 O-linemen who are listed as the starters via PFR. I will be doing this for each position at the OL, so if you believe that a certain position is more important than another, you can take that into consideration (my personal order of importance is C, LT, RT, RG, LG). At the end I'll do a comprehensive look at all the OL together so there'll be a comprehensive look as well.
Let's start with Montana's OL.
LT
1981: Dan Audick
1982: Lindsey Mason
1983-1987: Bubba Paris
1988: Steve Wallace
1989-1990: Bubba Paris
1993-1994: John Alt
So 7 years of Bubba Paris, 2 years of John Alt, 1 year of Dan Audick, Lindsey Mason, and Steve Wallace.
Bubba Paris was a left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 55.
John Alt was a 2-time Pro Bowl left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 17.
Dan Audick was a left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Lindsey Mason was a left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Steve Wallace was a 1-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his left tackles over his career was 94, at an average of 7.8 total AV per year.
LG
1981-1986: John Ayers
1987-1988: Jesse Sapolu
1989-1990: Guy McIntyre
1993-1994: Dave Szott
So 6 years of John Ayers, 2 years of Jesse Sapolu, Guy McIntyre, and Dave Szott.
John Ayers was a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 48.
Jesse Sapolu was a 1-time Pro Bowl left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 14.
Guy McIntyre was 5-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 21.
Dave Szott was a 1-time 1st team All-Pro left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 15.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his left guards over his career was 98, at an average of 8.2 total AV per year.
C
1981-1986: Fred Quillan
1987-1988: Randy Cross
1989-1990: Jesse Sapolu
1993-1994: Tim Grunhard
So 6 years of Fred Quillan, 2 years of Randy Cross, Jesse Sapolu, and Tim Grunhard.
Fred Quillan was a 2-time Pro Bowl center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 54.
Randy Cross was a center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 16.
Jesse Sapolu was a 1-time Pro Bowl center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 18.
Tim Grunhard was a 1-time Pro Bowl center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 16.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his centers over his career was 104, at an average of 8.7 total AV per year.
RG
1981-1986: Randy Cross
1987: Bruce Collie
1988: Guy McIntyre
1989: Bruce Collie
1990: Harris Barton
1993-1994: Will Shields
So 6 years of Randy Cross, 2 years of Bruce Collie and Will Shields, 1 year of Guy McIntyre and Harris Barton.
Randy Cross was a 3-time Pro Bowl, 3-time 2nd team All-Pro right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 67.
Bruce Collie was a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 16.
Will Shields was a 12-time Pro Bowl, 2-time 1st team All-Pro, 4-time 2nd team All-Pro, Hall of Fame right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 16.
Guy McIntyre was a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 6.
Harris Barton was a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his right guards over his career was 113, at an average of 9.4 total AV per year.
RT
1981-1986: Keith Fahnhorst
1987-1989: Harris Barton
1990: Steve Wallace
1993: Ricky Siglar
1994: Derrick Graham
So 6 years of Keith Fahnhorst, 3 years of Harris Barton, 1 year of Steve Wallace, Ricky Siglar, and Derrick Graham.
Keith Fahnhorst was a 1-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 1st team All-Pro right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 58.
Harris Barton was a 1-time Pro Bowl, 2-time 1st team All-Pro right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 23.
Steve Wallace was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
Ricky Siglar was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Derrick Graham was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 6.
The total accumulated AV that Montana had from his right tackles over his career was 102, at an average of 8.5 total AV per year.
To give a summarized look at Montana’s offensive line, here are his positional AVs per year, and a combined offensive line AV per year.
Montana: LT (7.8), LG (8.2), C (8.7), RG (9.4), RT (8.5), TOTAL (42.6)
Now, let’s take a look at Brady’s offensive line.
LT
2001-2004: Matt Light
2005: Nick Kaczur
2006-2007: Matt Light
2009-2011: Matt Light
2012-2014: Nate Solder
2015: Sebastian Vollmer
2016: Nate Solder
So 9 years of Matt Light, 4 years of Nate Solder, 1 year of Nick Kaczur and Sebastian Vollmer.
Matt Light was a 3-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 1st team All-Pro left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 97.
Nate Solder is a left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 39.
Nick Kaczur was a left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Sebastian Vollmer is a left tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 9.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his left tackles over his career was 152, at an average of 10.1 total AV per year.
LG
2001-2002: Mike Compton
2003: Damien Woody
2004: Joe Andruzzi
2005-2007: Logan Mankins
2009-2013: Logan Mankins
2014: Dan Connolly
2015: Shaq Mason
2016: Joe Thuney
So 8 years of Logan Mankins, 2 years of Mike Compton, 1 year of Damien Woody, Joe Andruzzi, Dan Connolly, Shaq Mason, and Joe Thuney.
Logan Mankins is a 7-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 1st team All-Pro, 5-time 2nd team All-Pro left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 104.
Mike Compton was a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 17.
Damien Woody was a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Joe Andruzzi was a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 11.
Dan Connolly was a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
Shaq Mason is a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 6.
Joe Thuney is a left guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his left guards over his career was 161, at an average of 10.7 total AV per year.
C
2001-2002: Damien Woody
2003-2007: Dan Koppen
2009-2010: Dan Koppen
2011: Dan Connolly
2012-2013: Ryan Wendell
2014: Bryan Stork
2015-2016: David Andrews
So 7 years of Dan Koppen, 2 years of Damien Woody, Ryan Wendell, and David Andrews, 1 year of Dan Connolly and Bryan Stork.
Dan Koppen was a 1-time Pro Bowl, 1-time 2nd team All-Pro center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 71.
Damien Woody was a 1-time Pro Bowl center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 18.
Ryan Wendell is a center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 20.
David Andrews is a center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 15.
Dan Connolly was a center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Bryan Stork is a center. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his centers over his career was 138, at an average of 9.2 total AV per year.
RG
2001-2003: Joe Andruzzi
2004-2007: Steve Neal
2009-2010: Steve Neal
2011: Brian Waters
2012-2013: Dan Connolly
2014: Ryan Wendell
2015: Tre’ Jackson
2016: Shaq Mason
So 6 years of Steve Neal, 3 years of Joe Andruzzi, 2 years of Dan Connolly, 1 year of Brian Waters, Ryan Wendell, Tre’ Jackson, and Shaq Mason.
Steve Neal was a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 43.
Joe Andruzzi was a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 24.
Dan Connolly was a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 18.
Brian Waters was a 6-time Pro Bowl, 2-time 1st team All-Pro right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 13.
Ryan Wendell is a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
Tre’ Jackson is a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 6.
Shaq Mason is a right guard. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his right guards was 120, at an average of 8.0 total AV per year.
RT
2001: Greg Randall
2002: Kenyatta Jones
2003: Tom Ashworth
2004-2005: Brandon Gorin
2006-2007: Nick Kaczur
2009: Nick Kaczur
2010: Sebastian Vollmer
2011: Nate Solder
2012-2014: Sebastian Vollmer
2015-2016: Marcus Cannon
So 4 years of Sebastian Vollmer, 3 years of Nick Kaczur, 2 years of Brandon Gorin and Marcus Cannon, 1 year of Greg Randall, Kenyatta Jones, Tom Ashworth, and Nate Solder.
Sebastian Vollmer is a 1-time 2nd team All-Pro right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 40.
Nick Kaczur was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 24.
Brandon Gorin was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 12.
Marcus Cannon is a 1-time 2nd team All-Pro right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 18.
Greg Randall was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 9.
Kenyatta Jones was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Tom Ashworth was a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 7.
Nate Solder is a right tackle. During that stretch, he had an AV of 8.
The total accumulated AV that Brady had from his right tackles was 125, at an average of 8.3 total AV per year.
To give a summarized look at Brady’s offensive line, here are his positional AVs per year, and a combined offensive line AV per year.
Brady: LT (10.1), LG (10.7), C (9.2), RG (8.0), RT (8.3), TOTAL (46.4)
To compare that to Montana, here’s his offensive line AV
Montana: LT (7.8), LG (8.2), C (8.7), RG (9.4), RT (8.5), TOTAL (42.6)
We can see here that Brady has had a more than significant advantage at LT and LG, with a difference of around 2.5 AV per year. Their center play was similar with Brady getting a slight edge there. Then on the right side, Montana gains a significant advantage at RG, and a very slight one at RT. Overall, Brady seems to have had better line play than Montana. Since a lot of these names are unknowns and offensive line play is not that memorable, let me use these grades to create offensive lines of modern players to display the differences between Brady’s line and Montana’s, based on their career OL averages.
Brady’s Modern Line: Anthony Castonzo, Richie Incognito, Maurkice Pouncey, Joe Thuney, Riley Reiff
Montana’s Modern Line: Mike Remmers, Shaq Mason, Jeremy Zuttah, Andy Levitre, Alejandro Villanueva
But yeah, overall, not huge, but definitely noticeable advantage to Montana here for doing what he did with a worse offensive line.
Defenses
To me, there are two aspects of defenses that are important in helping the QB. The first is the defense’s ability to keep the opposing team’s score low, so the QB doesn’t have to play catch up during the game and take unnecessary risks to keep their team in it. The second is the defense’s ability to limit yardage to allow the offense to have a better time of possession and also better starting field position. I’m going to analyze both the Patriots and Niners in these fields and see how they compare, using their rank in their respective years in the relevant field, and a final average of all their ranks. Since the Niners only had 28 teams in the league while they were playing, I will adjust the final average rank of the defense to account for that and provide a number that would be accurate for a 32 team league. Keep this in mind when looking at the original ranks for each year.
First let’s start out with the points allowed per game.
Montana: 2, 23, 4, 1, 2, 3, 3, 8, 3, 2, 14, 7 AVG (6.0), ADJ AVG (6.9)
Brady: 6, 17, 1, 2, 17, 2, 4, 5, 8, 15, 9, 10, 8, 10, 1 AVG (7.7)
So here we see that Brady has a slight advantage due to his slightly worse defense in points per game, though its a very slight advantage as its not even a full rank in a list of sorted defenses by points per game. Essentially, both QBs were fairly fortunate to have a defense that kept the game within a reasonable amount of points so that they would be able to play at their best. Now let’s look at the other side of the defensive analysis, yards.
Montana: 2, 21, 10, 10, 14, 6, 1, 3, 4, 3, 11, 12 AVG (8.1) ADJ AVG (9.2)
Brady: 24, 23, 7, 9, 26, 6, 4, 11, 25, 31, 25, 26,13, 9, 8 AVG (16.5)
Here’s where the difference really leaps through the roof, and Brady gets a significant advantage. Brady’s defense was around average, maybe a smidge less than that, in yards allowed. However, Montana’s was top 10, which gives him a significant advantage in starting field position and time of possession. Clear advantage to Brady here in this aspect of the defensive analysis.
Once again, to give a modern comparison of what these defenses are similar to Montana’s average defense is similar to the Baltimore Ravens last year (9th in points, 7th in yards) and Brady’s average defense is similar to the Cincinnati Bengals (8th in points, 17th in yards).

TL;DR For that 99% of you that didn’t want to read this whole thing

Brady holds the advantage in the WRs he’s had, specifically he second receiver he’s had in a season being better than Montana’s, and the offensive line, particularly the left side where he’s been significantly better than Montana. On the other hand, Montana has worked with better RBs and rushers, and although their defenses have done similarly good jobs in limiting the scoring of the opponent, Montana’s were decidedly better at limiting their yardage as well. To give a full comprehensive look of their supporting casts in one section with modern comparisons (think about this as how they performed last year only):
Montana: Jordy Nelson (WR1), Terrelle Pryor (WR2), Jay Ajayi (RB), Mike Remmers (LT), Shaq Mason (LG), Jeremy Zuttah (C), Andy Levitre (RG), Alejandro Villanueva (RT), Ravens defense
Brady: Mike Evans (WR1), Larry Fitzgerald (WR2), LeGarrette Blount (RB), Anthony Castonzo (LT), Richie Incognito (LG), Maurkice Pouncey (C), Joe Thuney (RG), Riley Reiff (RT), Bengals defense
I believe the importance of each group of supporting cast to the QB’s success is as follows: WRs, O-line, RBs/rushing production, defense. However, when weighting the respective differences in each of the areas, I would rank the advantages that each QB had over the other in the following order, going from biggest advantage to smallest.
Brady’s receiving corps
Montana’s rushing attack
Brady’s offensive line
Montana’s defense
Overall, as Brady’s receiving corps gave more of an advantage than Montana’s rushing attack, and ditto for Brady’s OL vs Montana’s defense, I’d have to say that between the two Brady had the better overall supporting cast, though it is relatively close. I would like to mention again that their coaching situations were fairly similar, to the extent I’d consider it a wash.

Miscellaneous Comparisons

Section in comments

SUPER TL;DR

When you look at a combination of the stats, especially in the postseason to determine their “clutchness” and their supporting casts, it seems clear, at least to me, that Montana holds an edge on a per year basis. So if your criterion for GOAT is who was the best QB, given that they played a lot of years, around the same amount of other all-time greats, then chances are Montana is your GOAT. However, the conversation gets muddled when you add in the 2-3 years that Brady has played more than Montana. Even though he was slightly worse than Montana on a per year basis, worse in the postseason, and with an overall better supporting cast, you can’t deny the fact that he’s been doing it for longer than Montana. Then the conversation becomes does the edge that Montana had on a per year basis hold a higher weight in the GOAT debate than Brady’s longevity, which led to more individual accomplishments and ability to continue leading his team to success? There’s no clear answer here, and it honestly depends on who you’re talking to, and what their preferred definition of a GOAT is. The one thing I can say for sure though is that there isn't a definitive answer to this debate, and as of right now at the least, and both Brady and Montana are worthy holders of the GOAT QB title.
Please let me know if you have any questions or suggestions on what to add to the comparison, or how to improve it. This is my first time doing an analysis that’s this in-depth so I’m really hoping it was an interesting read!
submitted by Maad-Dog to nfl

0 thoughts on “Fifa 07 torrent crack files

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *